Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SPS sway bars

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SPS sway bars

    So I am looking at picking up a used 17.5 mm. Anything I should look out for during installation? I know there was something about the bushings. How about price? I don't want to overpay for a used piece of equipment. Thanks everybody.
    [quote author="shortbus"]Stage 2 is great. Its covered by warranty, better fuel economy, the eaton screams louder so deer wont jump onto the road, it makes girls get wet, and the emissions produced will not kill songbirds or melt glaciers.[/quote]<br />[quote author="retardpartol"]...who is sober and noton any kind of intoxication whether is be ibuprophin[/quote]<br />LSJ phun

  • #2
    as long as the price isnt outrageous, get it. these things are a rare commodity nowadays. youre lucky to find one.

    as for the bushings, youll need some sort of locking collars to keep the bar from moving laterally (poly bushings dont hold the bar like rubber ones do) and interfereing with other suspension bits. grease the bushings liberally as well to prevent squeaking.

    thats bout all i can think of... i didnt feel like ripping my rear subframe apart on jackstands to install mine, so i had my alignment shop do the install for me.


    Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut. -Ernest Hemingway

    Comment


    • #3
      im lucky i even found my 17.5mm bar but for reference energy suspension 9.5155 is the bushings i got and mcmaster carr had the locking collars needed.
      [color=red]-Tyler[/color]<br /><br />2005 Chevy Trailblazer<br />1999 Saturn SL2<br />2002 Suzuki Bandit 1200

      Comment


      • #4
        id pay anything up to 150-175 for that bar. Thats a bit high but they dont make them anymore so its not like you can just go buy it new. I think with that bar all you need is the correct bushings for it, I think i remember it using the stock brackets and such.

        as far as installing it, its a complete pain in the ass. Just get down there and start playing with it. I think you have to take loose the brake lines to fit it in there IIRC.

        Comment


        • #5
          and the collars, they are good to have but im not positive they are a must. I wanted to get them for my 19mm bar but never got around to it. I've been running it for over a year and havent had a single problem to date. Not saying it isnt possible for the bar to slide around some and clank on something.

          Comment


          • #6
            Is this bar the 4-way adjustable one? If so then I'd grab it quick. They don't make them anymore and that is the best rear bar for our cars in my opinion. The stock rear bushings are too small and they are too flexible anyways. I installed the complete Energy Suspensions bushing kit at the same time I did the rear bar which made putting the bar in MUCH easier since I had it all apart anyways. You'll have take a file or grinder bit to open up the rear sway bar bushings a bit so it fits properly around the bar. Definitely lube it up just like ExHempKnight said and put on the collars too. Anothere thing I did was to get an extra set of swaybar bracket (the brackets that attach at the lower rear strut) and double them up. I took each maching pair and did some serious grinding until they fit togther pretty well and then had them welded together to increase their strength since that is a known weak point if you will driving the car very hard. Anymore ???? just ask.

            Comment


            • #7
              I installed mine with a friend, you do have to jack up the back and take both wheels off and disconnect some brake lines. But it was pretty straight forward. Just bleed your brakes when you are done.
              Fixing a Saturn can be like reaching into a bag of scorpions and hoping for the tootsie roll.

              AMR coilovers w/pillowball mounts, AMR FTB, AMR RST, Quaife, ACT clutch, HR con rods with JPC max bore pistons, Thermal exhaust, Hotshot header, AEM CAI, and I just want to run around tearing my cloths off, screaming beligerently, and spitting, and twitching, and foaming; because its finally done.

              Comment


              • #8
                Okay, thanks guys. So what is the instructions for the adjustments? Yes, the one I am looking at is the 4-way adjustable. I have also heard that one can't run certain combinations of strut bars and sway bars on our cars. Currently I have the FSB and am getting ready to install a RSB once the brackets are finished. Are these parts going to antagonize each other, as in breaking crap off the frame? Thanks.
                [quote author="shortbus"]Stage 2 is great. Its covered by warranty, better fuel economy, the eaton screams louder so deer wont jump onto the road, it makes girls get wet, and the emissions produced will not kill songbirds or melt glaciers.[/quote]<br />[quote author="retardpartol"]...who is sober and noton any kind of intoxication whether is be ibuprophin[/quote]<br />LSJ phun

                Comment


                • #9
                  They shouldn't....they actually help each other to some degree. I've heard some people had trouble with larger bars that were properly setup, but you should have any issues with this one.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by liamrh
                    So what is the instructions for the adjustments? Yes, the one I am looking at is the 4-way adjustable.
                    What do the 4 different points do? I have heard the terms "full soft" and "full hard" used in conjuction with the different settings before.
                    [quote author="shortbus"]Stage 2 is great. Its covered by warranty, better fuel economy, the eaton screams louder so deer wont jump onto the road, it makes girls get wet, and the emissions produced will not kill songbirds or melt glaciers.[/quote]<br />[quote author="retardpartol"]...who is sober and noton any kind of intoxication whether is be ibuprophin[/quote]<br />LSJ phun

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      full hard = stiffest setting. Going to make the rear more rigid and want to slide. Full soft is the exact opposite.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Which point or mark is the full soft vs. full hard? IDK much about the suspension stuff beyond struts/springs/tires etc. Thinking about it, would it be the outermost point that would be full hard? Thx.
                        [quote author="shortbus"]Stage 2 is great. Its covered by warranty, better fuel economy, the eaton screams louder so deer wont jump onto the road, it makes girls get wet, and the emissions produced will not kill songbirds or melt glaciers.[/quote]<br />[quote author="retardpartol"]...who is sober and noton any kind of intoxication whether is be ibuprophin[/quote]<br />LSJ phun

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fixed, just in case you didn't understand:

                          Originally posted by SupraCharged007
                          full hard = stiffest setting = the furthest hole from the end (closest hole to the bend in the bar). Going to make the rear more rigid and want to slide. Full soft is the exact opposite = the last hole toward the end of the bar.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by liamrh
                            Which point or mark is the full soft vs. full hard? IDK much about the suspension stuff beyond struts/springs/tires etc. Thinking about it, would it be the outermost point that would be full hard? Thx.
                            Nope...full soft. I'd start at full soft or the next one in. I put mine on full hard last year and did multiple rear-end-arounds.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              i agree with bud. I would start at full soft. if the front pushes, bring it up a notch. repeat until you get it to where its comfortable, I doubt you would want it on full hard for everyday street use, but it is possible

                              Comment

                              Related Topics

                              Collapse

                              There are no results that meet this criteria.

                              Working...
                              X